How Can Humans Improve Interactions with Wild Animals?—Roundtable Discussion, Jan. 27

How Can Humans Improve Interactions with Wild Animals?—Roundtable Discussion, Jan. 27

New York University’s Wild Animal Welfare Program will host “How Can Humans Improve Our Interactions with Wild Animals at Scale?”—a roundtable discussion featuring experts in the fields of animal and environmental studies, philosophy, and sociology—on Fri., Jan. 27, 5-6:30 p.m. EST. 

To RSVP for this virtual and in-person event, to be held at NYU’s Jurow Lecture Hall in the Silver Center for Arts and Science (31 Washington Place [at Washington Square East]), please visit the event page. For more information, please call 212.992.7997. 

The discussion, which will include a question-and-answer session with the audience, comes at a time when humans’ engagement with wild animals, such as mountain lion P-22 in southern California and Lake Tahoe bear “Hank the Tank,” is drawing scrutiny. It will consider the following: Why does wild animal welfare matter more than ever? What are the most urgent and actionable issues confronting wild animals? and How does wild animal welfare relate to conservation biology and other fields? 

The event’s speakers will include: Becca Franks, an assistant professor of environmental studies at NYU, co-director of the Wild Animal Welfare Program, and an associate editor for the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences; Jeff Sebo, a clinical associate professor of environmental studies at NYU, co-director of the Wild Animal Welfare Program, and author of Saving Animals, Saving Ourselves (2022); Christine Webb, a lecturer and post-doctoral researcher in Harvard University’s Department of Human Evolutionary Biology; Colin Jerolmack, a professor of sociology, chair of NYU’s Department of Environmental Studies, and author of The Global Pigeon (2013); and Dale Jamieson, professor emeritus of philosophy and environmental studies at NYU, director of the Center for Environmental and Animal Protection at NYU, and author of Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed—And What It Means for Our Future (2014). 

Subway Lines: 6 (Astor Place); R, W (8th Street).

Editor’s Note:
NYU’s Wild Animal Welfare Program, which conducts research and hosts events that examine the impact of human activity and environmental change on the well-being of wild animals, was established in 2022 and is housed in the university’s Environmental Studies Department. For more information, please visit its website. 

 

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